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Tuesday Courses [clear filter]
Tuesday, July 27
 

8:00am PDT

T10- Collaborating for open research in your campus' research enterprise and faculty grantsmanship support

FSCI courses are now closed. Course attendees must go to the course OSF page do see course materials and Zoom links.

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Do you want to see better partnerships between the Office of (Sponsored) Research, the library, research cores, academic departments, and faculty development?

This course is for those who support campus researchers – such as librarians, research development professionals, research administrators, and research managers – to discuss support for faculty grant success. We will work on partnerships to support open and public access, and FAIR data services specific to federally funded research. This is the perfect place for librarians to expand from single services like DMP support to wider grant support offerings. It will also be a good class for administrators wanting to build more support partnerships for their new faculty.

Federal funding agencies in the U.S. and many other regions expect faculty to move toward FAIR data and open scholarly communication. But faculty principal investigators (PIs) are not always able to incorporate FAIR and open scholarly communication practices into their workflows. PIs need to be connected to professionals who can support use of modern and emerging scholarly communication approaches in their grant-writing and grant compliance.

Each campus has many units willing to help faculty members. Librarians, mentors, research administrators, and others offer support for PI transitions to better scholarly communication practices. But these support offerings are not always aligned together. Join us for a place to discuss how your campus can grow scholarly communication support in the university “research enterprise.”

In this session, we will share different views of the funded research workcycle. As a group, we will discuss how support offerings align with research administrator and funder priorities. We will then work on plans for outreach to other campus units to partner on FAIR and open practices in faculty grant proposals.

LIVE ZOOM SESSION SCHEDULE (All times Pacific)
Tuesday, July. 27
8-9AM: First session
4-5PM: REPEAT First session
Thursday, July. 29
8-9AM: Second session
4-5PM: REPEAT Second session
Tuesday, Aug. 3
8-9AM: Third session
4-5PM: REPEAT Third session

Speaker/Instructors
avatar for Nina Exner

Nina Exner

Research data librarian, VCU
avatar for Erin Carrillo

Erin Carrillo

Science Research Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University
avatar for Stephen Bollinger

Stephen Bollinger

Assoc. Prof./Head of Library Systems, F.D. Bluford Library – North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University


Tuesday July 27, 2021 8:00am - 9:00am PDT
T10 Classroom

8:00am PDT

T11- FAIR for Data and Texts Not in the Open: Overcoming Legal, Technological, and Economic Barriers

FSCI courses are now closed. Course attendees must go to the course OSF page do see course materials and Zoom links.

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The rise of applied data science, digital humanities, machine learning, and artificial intelligence has resulted in an increased need for computational access and reuse of research data and publications. Researchers have begun to build FAIR (findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable) and open data practices for data they are generating; however, much computational research requires access to existing structured and well-curated texts and data from proprietary sources that don’t currently meet the FAIR standard. To accomplish this, many researchers are partnering with libraries, which frequently have long-term subscription access to such resources, to gain computational access and rights to reuse for text and data mining (TDM) and machine learning purposes.

Negotiating for such access and rights poses technical, economic, and legal challenges. In some cases, researchers have to negotiate access and reuse at the individual research group or project level. In this course, we will interactively explore these issues through case studies from real-life examples and share resources and tips that will help researchers, librarians, and vendors to “move the needle” toward FAIR data. The joint effort of researchers, librarians, and vendors will be required to sustainably ensure that resources move towards FAIR standards, and that researchers can share their own research output FAIRly.

Class activities include:
  • Small-group critique of license terms for computational access and reuse of publications and databases.
  • Mock negotiation between researchers/librarians and vendors.
  • Hands-on practice accessing a database through publicly available API services (e.g., Crossref, PubChem) and comparison with other computational access models.
  • Group discussion of cutting-edge questions on computational access and reuse. 

LIVE ZOOM SESSION SCHEDULE (All times Pacific)
Tuesday, July. 27
8-9AM: First session
4-5PM: REPEAT First session
Thursday, July. 29
8-9AM: Second session
4-5PM: REPEAT Second session
Tuesday, Aug. 3
8-9AM: Third session
4-5PM: REPEAT Third session

Speaker/Instructors
avatar for Ye Li

Ye Li

Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Librarian, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
LH

Laura Hanscom

Head of Scholarly Communications and Collections S, MIT Libraries
KZ

Katie Zimmerman

Director, Copyright Strategy, MIT Libraries
Katie Zimmerman is the Director of Copyright Strategy at the MIT Libraries and a licensed attorney in Massachusetts. She focuses on copyright and licensing issues for libraries and universities.


Tuesday July 27, 2021 8:00am - 9:00am PDT
T11 Classroom

8:00am PDT

T12 - Reproducibility for everyone: a train-the-trainer course for teaching reproducibility tools and methods

FSCI courses are now closed. Course attendees must go to the course OSF page do see course materials and Zoom links.

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An ecosystem of tools and methods for improving the rigor and reproducibility of research is thriving. Information professionals at research institutions must stay informed about what tools are available and how they compare. Ideally, they can also onboard researchers to kickstart their adoption. However, developing quality curriculum to train researchers on new tools requires expertise in the tool itself, which leaves many researchers without training on tools that may benefit their research.

This course will train participants to run hands-on, quality modules designed to onboard researchers to four free, open source tools. Participants will experience the module, practice the exercises, and explore the training material needed to run the module themselves. An instructor guide that includes the module outline, objectives, description, frequently-asked-questions, pre- and post- participant surveys, target audience, and instructions for running a successful module is included for each tool taught.

This course will train participants to run modules on unique aspects of reproducibility for researchers:
  • Data management
  • Electronic lab notebooks
  • Organizing and sharing protocols
  • Reagent sharing
  • Bioinformatics tools
  • Data and code sharing
  • Data visualization and analysis
  • Designing figures with images
Many FSCI participants already run short-duration training events at their institution. This course is ideal for those FSCI participants who wish to improve the quality and variety of the training they already offer to researchers. Participants who do not currently run short-duration training events at their institutions would benefit from the course by learning an accessible and efficient way of getting started with these modules.

For participants of last year’s version of this course, “Open source tools for everyone: a train-the-trainer course for teaching 4 open research tools”, these modules are new but designed to be interoperable with the modules taught at FSCI 2020.

LIVE ZOOM SESSION SCHEDULE (All times Pacific)
Note: there are no repeat session for this class. 
Tuesday, July. 27
8-9AM: First session
Thursday, July. 29
8-9AM: Second session
Tuesday, Aug. 3
8-9AM: Third session


Speaker/Instructors
RB

Ruchika Bajaj

University of California San Francisco
avatar for Jeremiah Pietersen

Jeremiah Pietersen

Manager: Learning and Training, Stellenbosch University Library
RP

Robyn Price

Imperial College London
avatar for Vicky Rampin

Vicky Rampin

ResearchDataManagement & Reproducibility Librarian, New York University
HY

Hao Ye

University of Florida


Tuesday July 27, 2021 8:00am - 9:00am PDT
T12 Classroom

8:00am PDT

T13- Fostering Open Scholarship across the Curriculum

FSCI courses are now closed. Course attendees must go to the course OSF page do see course materials and Zoom links.

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Open Scholarship expands the limitations suggested by the term "Open Science." Though many practitioners of Open Scholarship know that values of Open Scholarship are applicable across disciplinary boundaries, it can be difficult to bring them into humanities and social science classrooms, given the historic terminology "Open Science." Principles of Open Scholarship (as holdovers from Open Science) are valuable across disciplines; that is, they are useful in the sciences, social sciences, humanities, and interdisciplinary fields. Acknowledging and teaching them in classrooms across a variety of disciplines and a range of advancement within a discipline can benefit students, their instructors, and academia at large, as they encourage wider promotion of Open principles.

The first part of the course focuses on rationale for teaching Open Scholarship across disciplines, and discussions of who benefits from it. Participants in this course will have opportunities to examine their institutional cultures of Open Science and Open Scholarship, and how instruction can expand the reach of Open Scholarship within their own discipline as well as to other disciplines.

The second part of the course focuses on implementing Open Scholarship within a curriculum. Participants in this course will work to identify specific partners within their institutions and strategize how to leverage those partnerships to endorse the project, and they will map Open Scholarship into a specific curriculum. By the end of the course, participants should have a workable plan to include Open Scholarship principles in existing instruction, and to promote teaching Open Scholarship across a wide range of disciplines.

LIVE ZOOM SESSION SCHEDULE (All times Pacific)
Tuesday, July. 27
8-9AM: First session
4-5PM: REPEAT First session
Thursday, July. 29
8-9AM: Second session
4-5PM: REPEAT Second session
Tuesday, Aug. 3
8-9AM: Third session
4-5PM: REPEAT Third session

Speaker/Instructors
avatar for Jonathan Grunert

Jonathan Grunert

Scholarly Communications Librarian, SUNY Geneseo


Tuesday July 27, 2021 8:00am - 9:00am PDT
T13 Classroom

8:00am PDT

T15- How to introduce and implement policy in your institution and still have friends afterwards

FSCI courses are now closed. Course attendees must go to the course OSF page do see course materials and Zoom links.

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As momentum increases toward an open future, questions arise around the implications for research institutions. There are multiple challenges around policy, advocacy, and technology surrounding open research practice. Much of the work in the scholarly communication space involves advocacy – working with many levels of the institutional hierarchy. This course discusses the practical aspects of developing policy and navigating it through an institution – a lengthy and complex process. Participants will consider who the stakeholders are within their institution and collectively will look at the perspectives they might bring to the discussion. There will be some practical work on addressing various objections to provide advocacy and negotiation skills.

The course will be a mixture of synchronous and asynchronous learning. In total the course will take five hours for each of the two weeks of FSCI (10 hours in total). This will include an expected contribution to an introductory process prior to the starting date. You will also need to prepare for scheduled group work by watching a pre-recorded short lecture. Sessions will happen twice a day to allow for different time zones, and group work will occur with people in a time zone close to you. The final day in week two will be a meeting of the whole group – we will work together to decide the best (or least worst!) time zone for everyone.

LIVE ZOOM SESSION SCHEDULE (All times Pacific)
Tuesday, July. 27
8-9AM: First session
5-6PM: REPEAT First session
Thursday, July. 29
8-9AM: Second session
5-6PM: REPEAT Second session
Tuesday, Aug. 3
8-9AM: Third session
5-6PM: REPEAT Third session
We will have one additional session on Thursday August 5 which we will schedule when we contact the participants


Speaker/Instructors
avatar for Danny Kingsley

Danny Kingsley

Associate Librarian, Flinders University Library
Danny is a consultant and expert in developing strategy and policy in the higher education and research sector with extensive international experience, most recently in Europe and the UK. She has a particular focus on Open Research and research communication. Her work involves aspects... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Shreeves

Sarah Shreeves

Vice Dean, University of Arizona Libraries, University of Arizona
I am the Vice Dean of the Libraries at the University of Arizona - I essentially act as the Chief Operating Officer. Our IT department, Special Collections, Access and Information Services, and Research Engagement (where scholarly communications, data science, data management, and... Read More →


Tuesday July 27, 2021 8:00am - 9:00am PDT
T15 Classroom

8:00am PDT

T16- Data Utopia: Building a FAIRer Future in Research Data Management

FSCI courses are now closed. Course attendees must go to the course OSF page do see course materials and Zoom links.

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Are you providing a research data management (RDM) service or services? Do you think RDM would benefit from more Open and FAIR Data? But do you feel like you are constantly reacting to the needs or researchers, the growing variety of software and tools, and the shifting policy landscape, but you are never able to stop and think about strategy? Well this is the workshop for you!

These hands-on virtual sessions will allow those who are RDM service providers – librarians, IT managers, data protection officers, project officers and managers, trainers, research administrators – to have a rare opportunity to really look at the big picture of RDM strategy and progress. The immense added benefit is that they can do so alongside other RDM service providers, thus revealing common challenges, recurring themes, shared goals, and cross-cutting solutions which all can take away and implement.

In this course we will use an adapted version of the Future Search workshop concept to explore three key areas: challenges, future vision, and implementing solutions. In the first session we will identify challenges in RDM service provision and then look together at the common themes that emerge. In the second session we will be really creative and imagine a utopian future where RDM in universities and research institutes is perfect and FAIR! In the third session we will look at how we can move towards that perfect world today, how we can overcome the challenges, and what practical ideas have worked so far.

Taken together these three sessions will allow a space for RDM service providers to really reflect on the current issues they collectively face, and how the principles of Open Research and the guidelines of FAIR data can be included in strategy management going forward.

LIVE ZOOM SESSION SCHEDULE (All times Pacific)
Tuesday, July. 27
8-9AM: First session
10-11PM: REPEAT First session
Thursday, July. 29
8-9AM: Second session
10-11PM: REPEAT Second session
Tuesday, Aug. 3
8-9AM: Third session
10-11PM: REPEAT Third session


Speaker/Instructors
avatar for Emma Harris

Emma Harris

HEI Initiative Manager
avatar for Katarzyna Biernacka

Katarzyna Biernacka

Researcher, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin


Tuesday July 27, 2021 8:00am - 9:00am PDT
T16 Classroom

9:00am PDT

T17- Losing Our Scholarly Record and What We Can Do About It

FSCI courses are now closed. Course attendees must go to the course OSF page do see course materials and Zoom links.

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Most aspects of scholarly communication happen on the web. The dissemination speed of scholarly knowledge has dramatically increased because we are able to publish and access information on the web. While this environment comes with lots of new opportunities, it also poses challenges, specifically to the longevity of the scholarly web-based record. Increasingly, as authors of scientific articles we reference resources on the web such as project websites, scholarly wikis, ontologies, datasets, source code, presentations, blogs, and videos.

While these resources are referenced to provide essential context for the research, they are, just like any other web resource, subject to the dynamic nature of the web and hence likely to disappear or significantly change over time. For scholarly journal articles, we enjoy the benefits of archival systems such as LOCKSS and Portico, but we have no orchestrated preservation infrastructure in place for what we call “web at large” resources. These observations raise significant concerns regarding the and long-term availability and access of web-based scholarly artifacts.

This course aims at outlining the extent of this reference rot problem and how it impacts our ability to revisit web content cited in scholarly articles some time after their publication. The course will also provide participants with an overview of and hands-on experience with approaches and tools available to authors, archivists, librarians, publishers, and others to address this problem.

LIVE ZOOM SESSION SCHEDULE (All times Pacific)
Tuesday, July. 27
9-10AM: First session
4-5PM: REPEAT First session
Thursday, July. 29
9-10AM: Second session
4-5PM: REPEAT Second session
Tuesday, Aug. 3
9-10AM: Third session
4-5PM: REPEAT Third session

Speaker/Instructors
avatar for Martin Klein

Martin Klein

Scientist, Los Alamos National Laboratory


Tuesday July 27, 2021 9:00am - 10:00am PDT
T17 Classroom

9:00am PDT

T18 - Unpacking the Role of Preprints in Scholarly Inclusion

FSCI courses are now closed. Course attendees must go to the course OSF page do see course materials and Zoom links.

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Researchers are becoming increasingly aware of preprints: complete and public drafts of unreviewed scientific documents. Preprint publishing and data archiving in repositories has dramatically increased in recent years due to changing researcher priorities, and requirements set by funders and publishers. This has created a variety of challenges and opportunities as it relates to scholarly inclusion and academic rigor. In this workshop we will cover an overview of preprint-publishing and research-archiving platforms and the various ways researchers can engage with preprints in their field. We will discuss the challenges that come with the rise in preprint publishing and highlight the importance of creating a culture that fosters open scholarly dialogue to make research more transparent, accessible, and inclusive.


Collaborators and guest lecturers: Raquel Aragón, UCLA; Dr. Shawntel Okonkwo, PhD, ZS Associates, Inc.; Dr. Joe Udeochu, PhD, Regeneron.

LIVE ZOOM SESSION SCHEDULE (All times Pacific)
Tuesday, July. 27
9-10AM: First session
5-6PM: REPEAT First session
Thursday, July. 29
9-10AM: Second session
5-6PM: REPEAT Second session
Tuesday, Aug. 3
9-10AM: Third session
5-6PM: REPEAT Third session

Speaker/Instructors
avatar for Ibraheem Ali

Ibraheem Ali

Sciences Data Librarian, UCLA


Tuesday July 27, 2021 9:00am - 10:00am PDT
T18 Classroom

9:00am PDT

T19- Four recommendations for open source software (4OSS lesson)

FSCI courses are now closed. Course attendees must go to the course OSF page do see course materials and Zoom links.

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Scientific data-driven research relies on software to create, process and analyze data, yet software is not always developed following practices that ensure its quality, sustainability and FAIRness. Rather than proposing new software development best practices, this course aims to provide researchers using some code in their projects with four simple recommendations encouraging the adoption of existing best practices. Software development best practices promote better quality software, and better quality software improves the reproducibility and reusability of research. These four recommendations are designed around Open Source values, and provide practical suggestions that contribute to making research software and its source code more discoverable, reusable and transparent. This course is aimed at researchers working with software (or willing to do so) as part of their regular activities.

LIVE ZOOM SESSION SCHEDULE (All times Pacific)
Tuesday, July. 27
9-10AM: First session
Midnight - 1AM next day: REPEAT First session
Thursday, July. 29
9-10AM: Second session
Midnight - 1AM next day: REPEAT Second session
Tuesday, Aug. 3
9-10AM: Third session
Midnight - 1AM next day: REPEAT Third session

Speaker/Instructors
LJ

Leyla Jael Garcia Castro

Team leader, ZB MED Information Centre for Life Sciences
EM

Eva Mart'in del Pico

Barcelona Supercomputing Center
avatar for José M. Fernández

José M. Fernández

Senior Research Engineer, Barcelona Supercomputing Center
avatar for Fotis Psomopoulos

Fotis Psomopoulos

Researcher, Institute of Applied Biosciences, Centre for Research and Technology Hellas
AV

Allegra Via

Research scientist, National Research Council of Italy


Tuesday July 27, 2021 9:00am - 10:00am PDT
T19 Classroom

9:00am PDT

T20- Case studies in the Earth Sciences: Current approaches to publishing, data and computation

FSCI courses are now closed. Course attendees must go to the course OSF page do see course materials and Zoom links.

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Expectations of collaboration and contribution in the Earth, Space, and Environmental Sciences (ESES) are not always transparent. Increasingly scientists must navigate modern workflows that require an understanding of and attention to changing standards for publications and their associated research products. This course will take emerging and established researchers in Earth Science domains through current approaches to discipline-specific research workflows, including reproducibility, publishing, preserving and sharing data, and setting up computational and software environments at scale.

Attendees will leave with ideas and methods for constructing their own research workflows that incorporate ESES tools and perspectives.

Six sessions will be offered within the following three themes: Publishing, Data and Computation

Please note: Unlike most FSCI courses, there are no repeated live sessions in this class to accommodate all time zones. They are staggered so that everyone can reasonably attend at least some sessions – but all 7 course sessions below are unique and only offered once. Please take note of when the sessions will run in your time zone; attendees may need to watch recordings of at least some sessions.

LIVE ZOOM SESSION SCHEDULE (All times Pacific)
Tuesday, July. 27
9AM: Session 1: Introduction to Open and Reproducible Practices in Earth Sciences
1PM: Session 2: Your paper is published, it’s not the end of the journey
Thursday, July. 29
9AM: Session 3: Open Discussion Session/Informal Networking
4PM: Session 4: FAIR Data & Software Citation
5:15PM Session 5: Data Management Plans that ensure FAIR principles
Tuesday, Aug. 3
9 AM: Session 6: Collaborative, open geoscience in the cloud with Jupyter and Pangeo
4 PM: Session 7: Introduction to virtual work platforms (using CoESRA)

Speaker/Instructors
avatar for Sam Teplitzky

Sam Teplitzky

Open Science Librarian, UC Berkeley
@samteplitzky
avatar for Anusuriya Devaraju

Anusuriya Devaraju

Senior Data Innovation Manager, TERN, University of Queensland
avatar for Chris Erdmann

Chris Erdmann

Assistant Director, Data Stewardship, American Geophysical Union (AGU)
avatar for Siddeswara Guru

Siddeswara Guru

Program Lead, University Of Queensland
DE

Dasapta Erwin Irawan

Lecturer-researcher, Institut Teknologi Bandung
avatar for Natasha Simons

Natasha Simons

Associate Director, Data & Services, Australian Research Data Commons
Natasha Simons has her head in the clouds - literally, technically and figuratively. She loves research data and making good stuff happen. As Associate Director, Data & Services, at the Australian Research Data Commons she is responsible for programs that support the development of... Read More →
avatar for Alison Specht

Alison Specht

Ecosystem Research Analyst, TERN, University of Queensland
I am an ecosystem scientist (specially terrestrial and coastal ecosystems, forests and groundwater-dependent ecosystems) and academic by training and experience over half my career. The other half of my career has been about facilitating collaboration across boundaries, and the better... Read More →
avatar for Shelley Stall

Shelley Stall

Senior Director, Data Leadership, American Geophysical Union
Shelley Stall is the Senior Director for the American Geophysical Union’s Data Leadership Program. She works with AGU’s members, their organizations, and the broader research community to improve data and digital object practices with the ultimate goal of elevating how research... Read More →
WT

Wynn Tranfield

Librarian, UCLA Library


Tuesday July 27, 2021 9:00am - 10:00am PDT
T20 Classroom
 
Thursday, July 29
 

TBA

T - COURSES - DAY 2 (VIEW ONLY - DO NOT ADD TO YOUR SCHEDULE)

Day 2 ''T" Courses.  Please see the Course Start Date Session to sign up for the course and to see the course schedule on the course description page.  

Thursday July 29, 2021 TBA
OSF
 
Tuesday, August 3
 

TBA

T - COURSES - DAY 3 (VIEW ONLY - DO NOT ADD TO YOUR SCHEDULE)

Day 3 of Tuesday/Thursday Courses.  Please see the Course Start Date Session to sign up for the course and to see the course schedule on the course description page.  

Tuesday August 3, 2021 TBA
 
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